Fabian Williams SharePoint Blog

Solving problems with SharePoint day and night

How To: Upgrade your WSS 3.0 to Service Pack

Steps for Installing WSS 3.0 Service Pack 2 on your WSS Farm

1. Backup our Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS 3.0)Farm

2. Verify and Validate the Build of your WSS 3.0 Build Number

IF someone would be so gracious and provide a Before Shot of a WSS 3.0 CA “Servers in Farm” pic here

3. Execute the Service Pack 2 Executable for Windows SharePoint Services

clip_image002

clip_image004

clip_image006

The installer will go through extracting and installing the updates and conclude at the SharePoint Product and Technologies Wizard.

4. Click “Next” to begin the SP Product and Technologies Wizard

clip_image008

5. Click “Yes” to acknowledge that certain services will be stopped while the Farm and Databases areUpdated

clip_image010

NOTE: At this point, if there are multiple Servers in your environment, you must STOP at this point and run the SP2 Installer on the other Servers in the Farm before going any further. Once complete return to the first server and continue

6. Click “Ok” once you have completed [where required] installing the SP2 binaries on other WSS Servers in the farm

clip_image012

7. The SharePoint Products and Technologies Wizard will continue through up to 10 steps to completion

clip_image014

8. If all goes well you should see the Configuration Successful Screen below

clip_image016

9. The Central Administration “CA” site will come up afterwards. Verify that the build number now says 12.0.0.6421 and you are now up to SP2 on WSS.

clip_image018

10. Final step is to review the changes that accompany WSS 3.0 Service Pack 2 below

clip_image020

April 29, 2009 Posted by | SharePoint Administration, SharePoint How-To | Leave a comment

How To: Upgrade your MOSS 2007 to Service Pack 2

Steps for Installing WSS 3.0 Service Pack 2 and MOSS 2007 Service Pack 2 on your Farm

1. Backup our Office Server 2007 (MOSS) Farm

2. Verify and Validate the Build of your WSS 3.0 Build Number

clip_image002

3. Execute the Service Pack 2 Executable for Windows SharePoint Services on the server hosting the Central Administration (CA) Site.

clip_image004

clip_image006

clip_image008

clip_image010

The installer will go through extracting and installing the updates and conclude at the SharePoint Product and Technologies Wizard.

4. Click “Next” to begin the SP Product and Technologies Wizard

clip_image012

5. Click “Yes” to acknowledge that certain services will be stopped while the Farm and Databases areUpdated

clip_image014

NOTE: At this point, if there are multiple Servers in your environment, you must STOP at this point and run the SP2 Installer on the other Servers in the Farm before going any further. Once complete return to the first server and continue

6. Click “Ok” once you have completed [where required] installing the SP2 binaries on other WSS Servers in the farm

clip_image016

7. The SharePoint Products and Technologies Wizard will continue through up to 10 steps to completion

clip_image018

8. If all goes well you should see the Configuration Successful Screen below

clip_image020

9. The Central Administration “CA” site will come up afterwards. Verify that the build number now says 12.0.0.6421 and you are now up to SP2 on WSS.

clip_image022

10. Next you need to Install the Binaries [run the Executable for SP2 for MOSS 2007]

clip_image024

11. Accept the Agreement

clip_image026

12. Next the Installer will detect if the Product is ready to be Installed against, Extract the Files and Begin the Installation Process

clip_image028

clip_image030

clip_image032

clip_image034

13. After the Installation of the binaries are complete the SharePoint Product and Technologies Wizard will appear.

14. Click “Next” to begin the process

clip_image036

15. Click “Yes” to acknowledge that various services will stop while the upgrade is in progress

clip_image038

16. Allow the Upgrade process to continue for up to 9 or 10 steps

clip_image040

NOTE: At this point, if there are multiple Servers in your environment, you must STOP at this point and run the SP2 Installer on the other Servers in the Farm before going any further. Once complete return to the first server and continue

17. Click “OK” to confirm that you have installed the binaries on all the servers in the Farm

clip_image042

18. If all goes well you should see the Configuration Successful Screen below

clip_image044

19. Next the Central Administration “CA” site will come up afterwards. Verify that the build number now says 12.0.0.6421 and you are now up to SP2 on MOSS

clip_image046

April 29, 2009 Posted by | SharePoint Administration | Leave a comment

WSS and SharePoint Object Model

One of the most frequent question I get asked by developers is, tell me what the Object Model of SharePoint looks like.  I found a great clipping… here it is.

image

April 28, 2009 Posted by | SharePoint Administration, SharePoint Development, SharePoint General | Leave a comment

SQL Server 2008 Installation Guide

SQL Server 2008 Installation Guide

My Environment

Server: Windows Server 2008 [Spun up on a VPC with 1.5 G RAM] on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61P with 3 G RAM

The Build
Pre-Requisites

· To see the Hardware and Software Requirement please visit http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms143506.aspx#EE32

· In my environment I had already installed Windows Server 2008

o Applied the following Roles

§ Web Server

§ Application Server

Steps

1. Pre Setup and Configuration Steps

2. Setup and Configuration Steps

3. Post Setup and Configuration Steps

Pre Setup and Configuration Steps

1. Attach you CD ISO Image or Insert you CD/DVD Media into the Drive Bay. An auto-run will ensue and you will be presented with this screen
clip_image002

2. Click “Run SETUP.EXE”. Next the setup will inspect your system for the .NET Framework 3.5 with SP1. Failing that check, it will ‘attempt’ to install it for you. In my installation it failed as you will see below; however mitigation steps are included.
clip_image004

clip_image006
clip_image008

3.

Setup may fail here indicating that it cannot install .NET framework until .NET 2.0 SP1 is

installed. that is bogus. .NET 2.0 SP1 is installed with BASE windows 2008 and when

you install the roles of Web Server and Application Server .NET 3.0 is installed.

However, to overcome this, go the the directory below manually and install .NET 3.5 SP1

Indicate that you have read and Accepted the terms of the License Agreement and click “Install”
clip_image010

4. When you inspect the error you will see the below item.
clip_image012

5. Navigate to you Windows Explorer and double click the file “dotNetFx3Setup”
clip_image014

6. Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 Setup will execute and upon a successful installation of .NET Framework you will be presented with the following screen
clip_image016

7. Then you will be prompted to Restart your Server
clip_image018

8. Once you have rebooted and you are on your desktop, restart Setup from your ISO or CD/DVD Media. You will now be prompted to install a Hotfix for Windows.
clip_image020

9. Click “OK”, once you have done that the hotfix will install automatically and the following two screens will appear during the process and if the result was successful.
clip_image022
clip_image024

10. You will be prompted to restart your Server again. Click “Restart Now” to continue

Setup and Configuration Steps

1. Once you have rebooted and you are on your desktop, restart Setup from your ISO or CD/DVD Media. You will be presented with a Wizard Popup as indicated below
clip_image026
clip_image028

2. Setup will perform an inspection of your Hardware, Operating System , and File System and Registry. If successful, you will see the screen below.
clip_image030

3. You may need to click "Show Detail" displayed as "Hide Detail" in my screen shot to verify what was checked, and if an error was thrown you would click the link under the status section. Furthermore, you may review a detailed report by clicking on the link labeled “View Detailed report”
clip_image032

4.

NB. If you remove the License Key from the box Ctrl-C or X you will not be able to paste it back.

Click “OK” to continue and the SQL Installation wizard will continue. Next a Key will be present based on your Licensing Model with Microsoft, I removed CDW’s in the event this document is used for external purposes.
clip_image033
clip_image035

5. Click “Next”. You will then be presented with the License Acceptance Dialog Box
clip_image037

6. Select the checkbox and click “Next”. The next process will begin the launch of SQL Server 2008 Setup Support Files.
clip_image039

7. Once the checks have completed click Install and if any errors or warning were experienced you will be presented with a report to remediate the issues. In my installation, I am on a Microsoft VPC Image, the NICS are not Public Facing and I hard coded my IP on an internal address. I received two warnings one of which is as a result of my own configuration; the other is based on Windows Default Configuration. Your own situation may be different.
clip_image041
clip_image043
clip_image045

8. Click “Next” after you have remediated your issues, or choose to ignore them as I did. You will then be presented with the “Feature Selection” dialog box. Select the Server options you desire for this installation of SQL Server 2008 and click “Next”. By Default it is Blank none is selected, but I will load mine to the hilt.
clip_image047

9.

This is not where your Databases will live you will configure those options later on.

The next window presented will permit you to define your “Instance of SQL Server”, you may elect the “Default” instance if this is you first server instance or create a “Named Instance” if your situation merits. You may also change the Instance ID or accept the default and you may also configure where your Installation and “Root” files will live. Click “Next”
clip_image049

10. SQL Server will inspect your options and validate the space requirements based on your selection and return any miss-configurations to you if any. Assuming none, Click “Next”.
clip_image051

11. You will now configure your Server “Administrative and Services” Accounts. It is at this time if you were following best practice you would just select the User Accounts already created; but if you are like me, you will need to create them now. You may, as I elected to create one service account for all services so I don’t have to remember as many username/password combinations. Click Next once you have provisioned the credentials.
clip_image053
clip_image055

12. I will present two options although I only performed the latter.

a. If you choose to select a separate credential for each service you will have to click nect to the account name dropdown and browse for your account.
clip_image057
clip_image059

b. If you elect to use the same account for all your services then once you select that button, then you will see a this dialog box below
clip_image061

13. Select or Browse for your credentials and supply the password, Click “OK” when finished.

14. Once completed you will be presented with a window similar to the one below. Confirm and then you may select the “Collation” tab if you are concerned with the case sensitivity of your Database entries or Language concerns. If not, leave the defaults and Click “Next”.
clip_image063
clip_image065

15. The “Database Engine Configuration” dialog box is presented next. Here you will determine if you will use “Windows Authentication” or “Mixed Mode” for your End User and code interaction with this SQL Instance. Furthermore, with SQL Server 2008 you can now include additional SQL Server Administrators right from this menu. Very Cool! Click the “Database Directories” Tab and here is where you will…
clip_image067

16.

This article does not discuss the provisioning of File Groups, RAID, SAN, or other disk provisioning methods. I just selected the default, not recommended for Production

Configure the locations of the System Databases and mentioned earlier in step 9.
clip_image069

17. You may also select the “FILESTREAM” Tab, but I don’t know what that does yet.
clip_image071

18. If you selected “SQL Server Analysis Service” [SSAS] then here is where you would need to configure Account and Directory Information as we did for the Server Engine above. Click the “Data Directories” Tab to determine the location of SSAS files.
clip_image073
clip_image075

19. After you click “Next”, you will get to the screen I have been waiting for, the NEW Reporting Services of SQL Server specifically configured for Microsoft Office SharePoint Server…and other options. Make your selection for Default, SharePoint or no configuration of the Reporting Service. Click “Next”
clip_image077

20. The “Error and Usage Reporting” Dialog box is presented next. Select your options and click “Next”.
clip_image079

21.

To get a detailed report go here: C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Setup Bootstrap\Log\20080821_205927\SystemConfigurationCheck_Report.htm

Once you have completed that step, you are almost there and now the SQL Installer will verify and validate your selections and options as denoted below. As usual you may show or hide the report and/or view a detailed Web report. Click “Next” when you are or have satisfied the selections.
clip_image081

22. The final screen before SQL Server takes over and commits the install is another verification screen or a “Last Chance” if you will, Click “Install” and you are on you are ‘Bolt-ing’ on your way.
clip_image083

23. This part is the longest, for my install it took over 35 minutes to complete, but if you are successful, you will be presented with a continual progress screen and eventually a success screen.
clip_image085

24. As the process winds down to a close, another progress wizard dialog box will appear and then…
clip_image086
clip_image088
clip_image090

25. You have just Successfully Installed SQL Server 2008. Next the Post Setup and Config Steps.

Post Setup and Configuration Steps

1. Verify and Validate your Services by selecting the “SQL Server Configuration Manager” in Program Files à SQL Server 2008. Make sure the service that should be running are running.
clip_image092

2. Verify and Validate that the Protocols that should be operational are operational
clip_image094

3. Log on and Verify that you can use the new Management Studio
clip_image096

4. Verify and Validate your System and User Databases
clip_image098

5. Check your SQL Instance Properties. Right Click on the Server Instance and Click Properties
clip_image100

6. Good Luck Hope this Helps! SQL 2008 ROCKS! For comments or questions please feel free to contact me. Fabian Williams – Fabian.Williams@CDW.com

April 28, 2009 Posted by | SQL Server | Leave a comment

Setting up NLB for your WFE’s in SharePoint

great article originally found here:  http://www.west-wind.com/presentations/loadbalancing/NetworkLoadBalancingWindows2003.asp

NLB – Network Load Balancing

WFE – Web Front Ends

Setting up NLB

In order to utilize the Windows Server Network Load Balancing features you will need two machines running Windows Server 2003. Each machine needs to have at least one network card and at least one fixed IP address. Although running with one adapter works well, for best performance it’s recommended that you have two adapters in each machine – one mapped to the real IP Address (Microsoft calls this the Dedicated IP) and one mapped to the ‘virtual’ IP Address (Microsoft calls this the Cluster IP). Be aware that NLB uses some advanced networking features of network adapters, so it’s possible that some low end adapters (especially those for non-server machines) may not support the required NDIS protocols.

In addition you will also need one more machine for testing (3 machines total). The test machine should be external as you can’t use a machine from the pool to test – it will only fire request on the local machine since the IP requests are not traveling over the network when you hit the virtual IP address – it goes to the local machine.

I’m going to use two ‘servers’ here to demonstrate how to set up and run NLB. Assume the IP addresses for these machines are 111.111.111.1 and 111.111.111.2. To create a virtual IP address (Cluster IP) you need to pick an available IP Address on the same Class C network segment. In my example here I’ll use 111.111.111.10.

Unlike previous versions of NLB the new version has a central manager application that you can use to create a cluster from a single machine. Gone are the hassles of having to manually configure each machine manually – you can do it all from a single machine over the network which is a welcome change.

To start setting up this cluster bring up the Network Load Balancing Manager from the Administrative Tools menu. Figure 1 shows what the cluster manager looks like.

clip_image001

Figure 1 – To set up a new NLB cluster bring up the Network Load Balancing Manager and right click to createa a new cluster.

Right-click on the root node to add a new cluster. Next configure the basic cluster configuration, which will consist of assigning the Cluster or virtual IP address. Figure 2 shows what this dialog looks like filled out for our test network.

clip_image002

Figure 2 – Configuring the Cluster IP. This is the ‘virtual’ IP address
that will service all servers in the cluster. Note that you should set the
operation mode to Multicast if you are using a single adapter.

The IP Address is the virtual IP address for the cluster that will be used to address this cluster. NLB will actually create a new IP address on each machine in the cluster and bind it to the specified network adapter (in the next step). Choose a subnet mask – make sure you use the same one for all servers in the cluster. The Full Internet name is only for reference and is used here primarily for displaying the name of the server. But if you have a domain configured for the server you should use that domain name.

Cluster operation mode is very important. Unicast mode means that NLB takes over the network card it is bound to and doesn’t allow any additional network traffic through it. This is the reason why two adapters are a good idea – one that NLB can take over and one that can still handle all other network traffic directed at the dedicated IP address of the server. If you’re using a single adapter you should probably select Multicast which allows both the NLB traffic and the native IP traffic to move through the same network adapter. Multicast is slower than Unicast as both kinds of traffic need to be handled by the network adapter but it’s the only way to remotely configure all machines centrally. You can run a single adapter in Unicast mode, but the cluster manager will not be able to communicate with the server after it’s configured. As a general rule use Unicast for two adapters, Multicast for a single adapter. With my network cards I had to use IGMP mode in order to get the cards to converge properly – you may have to experiment with both modes to see what works best for you.

Leave the Allow Remote Control option unchecked. This allows you to reconfigure the nodes and port rules remotely, although I found little need to do so. Any changes made to the cluster are automatically propagated down to the nodes anyway, so there’s little need to do this with the exception of changing the processing priority. If you do want this functionality I suggest you enable it after you have the cluster up and running.

The next dialog called Cluster IP Addresses allows you to add additional virtual IP addresses. This might be useful if you have a Web server that is hosting multiple Web sites each of which is tied to a specific IP address. For our example here, we don’t need any and can just click next as shown in Figure 3.

clip_image003

Figure 3 – If you need to add additional IP addresses to be load balanced
you can add them here. This is needed only if you host multiple sites
on separate IP addresses and you need separate IPs for these.

Next we need to configure port rules. Port rules determine which TCP/IP port is handled and how. Figure 3 shows the Port Rules dialog with two port rules defined for Port 80 (http) and 443 (SSL). The default port configuration set up by NLB handles all ports, but in this case that rule is too broad. Port rules can’t overlap so if you create specific rules you either have to create them for each port specifically or create ranges that fit your specific ports.

clip_image004

Figure 4 – The Port Rules dialog shows all of the port rules defined for
cluster. By default a rule for all ports – 0 – 65365 is defined. Here I’ve

Created to specific port rules for port 80 and 443.

To add a new port rule click on the Add button which brings up the dialog shown in Figure 5. Here you can configure how the specific port is handled. The key property is the Filtering Mode which determines the affinity of requests. Affinity refers to how requests are routed to a specific server. None means any server can service the incoming request. Single means that a specific server has to handle every request from a given IP address. Generally None is the preferred mode as it scales better in stateless applications. There’s less overhead in NLB as it doesn’t have to route requests in many cases. Single mode is useful for server connections that do require state, such as SSL connections for HTTPS. Secure Server Certificates performs much better with a persistant connection rather than having to create new connections on each of the servers in the pool for requests. Figure 1 shows the configuration for the standard Web Server port – port 80.

clip_image005

Figure 5 – Setting port rules lets you configure how the cluster
responds to client requests. Affinity in particular determines
whether the same server must handle all requests from
a specific IP address (single) or Class C IP address range (Class C).

To set up the second rule for the SSL Port I added another rule and then changed the port to 443 and changed the affinity to single.

Although you can’t do it from here, another important setting is the priority for each machine for each port rule. You can set up Machine 1 to take 80% of the traffic and the second 20% for example. Each rule can be individually configured. We’ll see a little later why this is important for our SSL scenario.

The rules set in this dialog are propagated to all the cluster servers, which is significant, because the cluster port rules must be configured identically on each of the cluster node servers. The configuration tool manages this by remotely pushing the settings to each of the cluster nodes Network Connections IP configuration settings. This is a big improvement over previous versions where you manually had to make sure each machine’s port rules matched and stayed matching.

Up to this point we have configured the cluster and the common parameters for each node. Now we need to add individual nodes to the cluster. Figure 6 shows the dialog that handles this step for the first node as part of the configuration process.

clip_image006

Figure 6 – Adding a node by selecting the IP address and picking a specifc
network adapter.

When you click Next you get to another dialog that lets you configure the cluster node. The main feature to configure on this dialog is the Priority which is a unique ID that identifies each node in the cluster. Each node must have a unique ID and the lower the number the higher the priority. Node 1 is the master which means that it typically receives requests and acts as the routing manager although when load is high other machines will take over.

clip_image007

Figure 7 – Setting the node parameters involves setting a priority for
the machine, which is a unique ID you select. The lower the number
the higher the priority – this machine acts as the master host.

Click finish and now we have one node in our cluster.

Actually, not quite so fast. Be patient, this process isn’t instant. When you click finish the NLB manager actually goes out and configures your network adapter for you. It creates a new IP address in your network connections, enables the Network Load Balancing service on your network adapter(s) you chose during setup and configures the setting we assigned on the NLB property sheet.

You’ll see your network connection flash on and off a few times during this configuration process on the machine you are configuring to be a host. This is normal, but be patient until you see your network connection back up and running.

If all goes well you should see your network connection back up and running and see a new node in the NLB Manager sitting below the cluster (see Figure 8 which shows both nodes). If everything is OK the Status should say Converged. If it does node 1 is ready.

But we’re not quite done yet – we still need to add the second node. To do so right-click on the cluster, after which you go through the steps shown in Figure 7 and 8 one more time. Again be patient, this process is not super fast – it takes about 20 seconds or so to get a response back from a remote machine. Once you click finish the process of Converging can take a minute or more.

clip_image008
Figure 8 – The final cluster with both nodes converged and ready to process requests.

Troubleshooting Tips

I’ve had a few problems getting convergence to happen for the first time. It helps to follow the steps here closely from start to finish and if for whatever reason you end up removing nodes make sure you double check your network settings first before re-adding nodes.

You can check what NLB did in the Network Connections for your machine (Figure 9). Click on the Load Balancing section to see the settings made there. Remember that the settings should match between machines with the exception of IP Addresses assigned for each machine. You should also see the new IP address added in the Internet Protocol settings’ Advanced page.

clip_image009

Figure 9 – All of the setting that NLB makes are made
to the network adapter that the virtual IP is bound to.
You can click on the Network Load Balancing item to
configure the node settings as described earlier. The Virtual
IP also has been added in the Internet Protocol | Advanced
dialog.

If things look Ok, make sure that the machines can ping each other with their dedicated IPs. Figure 10 shows what you should see for one of the machines and you should run this test on both of them:

clip_image010
Figure 10 – Checking whether the machines can see each other.

Use IPCONFIG to see adapter information and you should see both your physical adapter and the virtual IP configured. Make sure that you don’t get any errors that say that there’s a network IP address conflict. If you do it means that the virtual IP is not virtual – ie. It’s entered but it’s not bound to the NLB service. In that case remove the IP and then configure the NLB first, then re-add the IP address. Alternately remove everything then try adding it one more time through the NLB manager.

I’ve also found that it helps to configure remote machines first, then configure the machine running the NLB Manager (if you are using it in the cluster) last. This avoids network issues on the manager machine – plain network access gets a little weird once you have NLB configured on a machine. Again this is a great reason to use two adapters rather than one.

April 28, 2009 Posted by | IIS, Windows Administration | 2 Comments

Why Re-Invent the Wheel – Use SharePoint Web Services that are OOB

Instead of writing your own code or if you want to run an application on a box that doesn’t have access to the SharePoint objects. Call Web Services that ship with SharePoint

Service

Description

websvcAdministration

Provides methods for managing a deployment of Windows SharePoint Services, such as for creating or deleting sites.

websvcAlerts

Provides methods for working with alerts for list items in a SharePoint site.

websvcAuthentication

Provides classes for logging on to a SharePoint site that is using forms-based authentication.

websvcCopy

Provides methods for copying items between locations in Windows SharePoint Services.

websvcDocumentWorkspace

Provides methods for managing Document Workspace sites and the data they contain.

websvcForms

Provides methods for returning forms used in the user interface when working with the contents of a list.

websvcImaging

Provides methods that enable you to create and manage picture libraries.

websvcListDataRetrieval

Provides a method for performing queries against lists in Windows SharePoint Services.

websvcLists

Provides methods for working with lists and list data.

websvcMeetings

Provides methods that enable you to create and manage Meeting Workspace sites.

websvcPeople

Provides methods for working with security groups.

websvcPermissions

Provides methods for working with the permissions for a site or list.

websvcSharepointDirectoryManagementService

Provides methods for remotely managing distribution groups.

websvcSiteData

Provides methods that return metadata or list data from sites or lists in Windows SharePoint Services.

websvcSites

Provides a method for returning information about the site templates for a site collection.

websvcSPSearch

Provides methods for remotely performing searches within a Windows SharePoint Services deployment.

websvcUsersGroups

Provides methods for working with users, site groups, and cross-site groups.

websvcVersions

Provides methods for working with file versions.

websvcViews

Provides methods for working with views of lists.

websvcWebPartPages

Provides methods to send and retrieve Web Part information to and from Web services.

websvcWebs

Provides methods for working with sites and subsites.

April 28, 2009 Posted by | SharePoint Administration, SharePoint Development, SharePoint General, SharePoint How-To | Leave a comment

1 Step Process – Flash Animation Web Part for WSS 3 and MOSS 2007

Using the Visual Studio 2008 Extensions for SharePoint

I did a three (3) part Post on Developing and Deploying a Flash Animation Web Part for WSS and MOSS 2007.  In that laborious process we created the Web Part DLL, we created a project to hold the Web Part Files and then we used STSADM tools to deploy it.  While that brute force may be fun for some, SharePoint does have an easier way if you are developing in Visual Studio 2008 as I am.  In fact in this Post I am also using the recommended way of creating Web Part Controls; in my previous post I used the Render Method with the HTMLTextWriter, using that method does not allow me ‘at a minimum’ to interrogate and interact with the Event Handlers at runtime.  So in this post I am using the CreateChildObject Method…

What you will Need!
  • Visual Studio 2008
    • Project 1 – An Empty Project out of the VS 2008 Extensions Template
  • Visual Studio 2008 Extensions for SharePoint
  • WSS 3.0 or MOSS 2007
  • A working knowledge of
    • WSS 3.0 / MOSS 2007 Object Model
    • C#
  • Time… this time it took me a little under two hours to get this to work and do all my screen shots. But I have the advantage of just cutting and pasting my code from my earlier projects.

Here Goes

First you will need to Install the Visual Studio 2008 Extensions for SharePoint; this provides additional templates suited for WSS and MOSS development, along with scripts to Add and Deploy solutions  to the MOSS solutions store.

Step 1:  Create a New Project, I did an empty project rather than beginning with the Web Part Project.  So… you may ask, why?… Well I have found that when I begin with a Web Part Project it creates an automatic folder called WebPart1 and supporting files with the same name.  I have tried to rename the Folder and Files, but that proved to be too much work. So I create an empty project and ADD a web Part to the solution; this provides me the ability to name my folder thus keeping the name personalized from Jump!

image

image

Below is the Solution View of the Project. Notice it has the Strong Name already created.

image

image

image

Below is the WSP view (tagged next to the Solution Explorer) where you can see the Files necessary to deploy the Web Part to the Solution Store. In essence all the files I created by hand in the Part 1 through Part 3 Blog earlier.  Its good practice to do it by hand because in this process you dont even touch the code and if something breaks you will have no knowledge how to fix it.

image

So the first thing you need to do is Code for your Web Part, since I already did this Brute Force, I am going to cut and paste my Property Gets and Sets to talk to set my Width, Height and swf Url location.  Notice also now in the Solution Explorer you have all the files automatically created for you.  Oops, one more thing I need to mention that I didn’t capture in the image below is a reference and inheritance to the System.ComponentModel [using System.ComponentModel;] this is needed so you can access your Property Procedures in your Web Part. But I corrected that in the smaller image below.

image

image

So now I am just going to cheat and cut and paste my Property Procedures as seen below.

image

So this is where we make some improvement on how we implemented the Flash Animation. This time we will use the CreateChildControls Method.

image

Deployment now is a piece of cake, you just have to point your "Start Action" in your Project Properties Debug Tab to the URL of the Top Level Site Collection that you want to deploy your solution to. See below.

image

Right click your Project in the Solutions Explorer and regular Click on Deploy… the VS 2008 Extensions scripts do the rest.  I copied my Outputs windows below so you can see exactly what happens.

image

Next you just have to (1) Add the Web Part (2) put your settings for Width, Height, and URL, and GO!

image

image

image

Work Smarter not Harder ! — Have Fun!

April 28, 2009 Posted by | SharePoint Development | Leave a comment